The Hawk

Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

Photo courtesy of Pexels

Photo courtesy of Pexels

Andrew Ball, Entertainment Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“I’m telling you, the streets is undefeated. Can’t beat the courts. Can’t beat the judge. You can’t beat the streets. You keep playing out there, you’re going to die. One way or another you’re going to die. Mentally or physically, the streets will eat you.” Andre Henry, a recovering addict, said this of opioids in an interview with Delmarva Now. His statement perfectly captures the everyday struggle that addicts face with opioid addiction.

Almost 3,000 people in Maryland have died due to overdoses since 2016. This number is decreasing, however, as people are becoming more aware of opioid addiction and educating themselves, and in turn,  saving lives in the process.

The introduction of naloxone HCI, better known as Narcan, is the first and only FDA-approved nasal form of naloxone for the emergency treatment of a known or suspected opioid overdose. Cities all over the country have access to Narcan and its implementation is already helping to save lives and lowers the number of deaths from overdose.

  Many states have declared a state of emergency because of the opioid epidemic. President Donald Trump declared a national emergency on Oct. 16, 2017. Although attention has been brought to this issue, most addicts are still not receiving the care and treatment that they need. Most addicts who are arrested for drug-related crimes never even get treated for it and roughly 80 percent of people incarcerated are addicts (delmarvanow.com).

Photo courtesy of getsmartdfc.com

  In 2017, new legislative actions in Maryland have emphasized treatment over punishment. Because treatment costs half as much as it does to incarcerate an addict, this strategy is anticipated to save states millions of dollars which will be reinvested into expanding resources.

The local organization Worcester County Warriors Against Opioid Addiction (WCWAOA) is leading the fight against addiction in the area. President of the organization Heidi McNeely detailed the organization’s goals saying, “We want to be able to continue to provide funding for people who face financial obstacles toward treatment.”

This does not mean directly paying for a person’s treatment but instead helping them along the way, such as covering the cost of a taxi or paying for them to stay in a home for a week. McNeely also stated that the organization’s main purpose is “to provide education, support, awareness, and navigation of resources to the people of Worcester County who have been impacted by the opioid epidemic.”

McNeely and the organization’s vice president Jackie Ball first decided to join the fight against opioid addiction when they saw their own sons struggle with their addictions. McNeely said, “After going through it, and seeing my son go through it, I just wanted to reach out and help people who were going through the same thing.”

She emphasized that a huge part of the fight was “to just spread awareness, eliminate the stigma, and encourage people to seek and ask for help.”

The fight against addiction is no doubt a tough one, but with awareness spreading, the tables may be turning in the people’s favor.

If you, a loved one, or someone you know is struggling with opioid addiction, please visit wocowarriors.org/resources for the help and resources you need.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Recycling: not just for paper

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    E.Coli outbreak in romaine lettuce affects 22 states

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Corporations working towards inclusion

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Popular herbicide may be causing short pregnancies

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Hidden Ingredients in Mario Badescu products

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Identifying signs of depression and anxiety

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Mental health at SDHS

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    Microneedling: improving the skin in a new way

  • Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction

    Health

    The health “reality” of the virtual world

  • A.M. Announcements

    Friday, May 25

The Student News Site of Stephen Decatur High School
Local activists continue the fight against opioid addiction