Fires damage historical sites

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Fires damage historical sites

Photos courtesy of Creative Commons

Photos courtesy of Creative Commons

Photos courtesy of Creative Commons

Mikayla Cantine, Staff Writer

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On April 15, Notre Dame Cathedral of Paris caught fire leading to extensive damages. The nearly 900-year-old sanctuary was undergoing renovations, which is believed to be a possible cause of the fire.  

The Cathedral roof collapsed in on itself, destroying the world-famous stained glass. Already, French President Emmanuel Macron has promised to begin the rebuilding of the Cathedral as soon as possible. This has led to a national donation scheme as of April 16 (cbsnews.com). 

Stephen Decatur High School foreign language students are offered a chance to visit France and Spain every two years as a class if they meet the requirements. Students are given the opportunity to travel to multiple sites around the two countries, one of which was the Notre Dame Cathedral. Now that most of the Cathedral has fallen, the site will not be the same. Although students will no longer have the chance to see the structure as it was originally built in 1163, they will be able to see the damage that can result from only one hour of misfortune. 

Additionally, a section of the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third holiest site in Islam, caughfire the same night although quickly containedThe two fires have no evidence of any connection, yet their timing is analogous (newsweek.com). 

Prior to these incidents, three black churches of Louisiana were burned over a tenday period. In these cases, a suspect has been identified, coincidentally on the same day as the Notre Dame fire (nbcnews.com). 

Although the majority of the world’s eye is focused on the Notre Dame destruction, these other fire incidents should not be disregarded. As these historical sites have suffered great loss, their images will never fade.