The Simpsons’ predictions

Pictured, is one of The Simpsons many predictions. This one involving the accurate guess of the 2005 Super Bowl win by the Denver Broncos.

Courtesy of Creative Commons

Pictured, is one of The Simpsons many predictions. This one involving the accurate guess of the 2005 Super Bowl win by the Denver Broncos.

The Simpsons is the longest running animated sitcom, and one of the most successful television programs ever made. This iconic show has become notorious for their predictions throughout the years regarding political, entertainment, and worldwide events.

When it comes to politics, adult-animations have never been exempt from poking fun and hitting on current events. Although, predicting events specifically, decades in advance is something only The Simpsons have achieved.

One of the most well known political predictions was the presidency of Donald Trump. In 2000, in season 11, an episode titled Bart to the Future was aired that showed Trump behind a podium as President of the United States. The episode ridiculed Trump, by predicting an economic decline after his presidency. RepublicWorld.com states, “The Simpsons, has an eerie knack for predicting the future, from Donald Trump’s presidency to the faulty voting machines in the 2008 US election.” One of the oddest parts about the prediction, is the accuracy of Trump’s clothing, from his blue suit to his signature red tie.

While the correct prediction regarding Trump’s presidency was something that made heads turn, it did not stop there. Sports fans were in complete disbelief when The Simpsons made a prediction that the Dallas Cowboys would win the Super Bowl in 1993 and it came true that same year.

Additionally, in a 2005 episode the Simpsons predicted that the Denver Broncos would beat the Seattle Seahawks in the Super Bowl 19-14, they did just that. Not to mention, they accurately predicted that the Washington Football Team, previously known as The Redskins, would win the Super Bowl in 1992, and three days after the episode aired, they won.

While naysayers debunk this conspiracy with the defense that it is simply coincidental, the findings are undeniable. According to Bill Oakley who told Time Magazine, “There are very few cases where The Simpsons predicted something. It is mainly just coincidence,  because the episodes are so old that history repeats itself.” While this is one side to the story, there are too many specifics. For example, the Simpsons have foreseen the Ebola Virus, Siegfried and Roy tiger attack, Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl LI performance and 9/11.

When The Simpsons predicted the Ebola Virus in season nine, 14 years before the event happened, it was displayed when Marge Simpson reads a book to Bart Simpson, titled, Curious George and the Ebola Virus. The scene went right over the heads of viewers initially, but when news broke that the prediction was true, it merely added to the list.

Next up, was the Siegfried and Roy tiger attack, in a 1993 episode they created a scene in which the magicians would be attacked by their tiger in the midst of one of their acts. In 2003, during a live performance, Roy was attacked.

Lastly, in an episode titled, Lisa Goes Gaga, a performer is seen suspended by cables, performing at a concert. Coincidentally, Lady Gaga performed at the Super Bowl LI halftime show and was seen wearing almost the exact same outfit and was suspended by cables, almost as if she was inspired by the 2012 episode.

Perhaps the most out of the box prediction was in an episode made in 1997. According to The Irish Times, “In The City of New York vs Homer Simpson, a moment alludes to the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center.” While not stating directly, “there is a frame where there’s a brochure that says New York at $9 a day, and behind the nine are the Twin Towers… it looks like 9/11.”

Like any other conspiracy, it is easy to take something small and run with it. While many of the findings can be a reach, certain incidences are almost impossible to explain. With the writers and producers of the show simply turning a blind eye whenever social media blows up over a new prediction that has proven itself true, no one will know how they do it.